Estrangement: What about hope?

estrangementby Sheri McGregor, M.A.

In the face of estrangement from adult children, the concept of hope frequently comes up. Some parents take comfort in the idea their estranged adult children might one day reconnect. Others waffle, wondering if hope is futile. Some parents let go of hope entirely, and believe it’s a positive step toward their emotional well-being. Others are troubled by the admission and worry that giving up hope isn’t normal.

Let’s take a closer look at the concept of hope as it relates to recovering from the pain of estrangement.

Estrangement: Is it wise to hope?

Parents suffering the throes of estrangement usually hang onto hope. Sometimes though, they wonder if hope is even realistic. They ask if it’s is healthy for them, or maybe holds them in a sort of limbo state.

“I would get caught up in magical thinking,” said one mother whose estrangement continues after six years. “At least I’ve come to see it like that.” This mother of two daughters whose oldest is estranged explains that in the beginning, she would often send texts, emails, and even phone messages (her daughter never answered), thinking if she just said the right thing, her daughter would return to her. “Now, I don’t believe anything I could do or say would make a difference,” she says. “But I still have hope.”

Hope is different than expectation.

This mom doesn’t equate her hope with expectation. People routinely hang onto hope when outcomes are beyond their control. Hope rises with the element of possibility more than probability. 1

Seeing hope for what it is allows you to get on with your own life.

In estrangement, can hope help?estrangement

For parents suffering the distress of estrangement from adult children, the hope of getting through the emotional trauma and having a happy life despite it can most certainly help.

Studies about hope often center on persons who are physically ill. Even so, we can learn from people whose precarious circumstances serve to highlight what’s most important in life. For these persons, hope can provide insight into their lives as a whole, and help them see how their past can intersect with their future.2

Similarly, parents devastated by an estrangement over which they have no real control can find a way to view and conceptualize hope as part of an overall narrative of their life and focus. For instance, seeing the part they played in their son or daughter’s upbringing—financially, emotionally, or otherwise—and understanding how that past role contributed to the adult child’s life and future as well.

Did you provide a stable environment? Allow your child to explore a variety of interests? Contribute financially to their physical wellness and/or education? Perhaps you were adventurous, and introduced your child to physical pursuits that widened their experiences and built their strength. How could things like these fit into your child’s adult life?

Ideas around hope can be unique, fitting into an individual parent’s personal life narrative. We always hoped for the best for their children. Continuing to hold out this hope for them, even in estrangement, can bolster our self-esteem and confidence. We are still good parents—despite our children’s choices.

estrangementHope for reconciliation:
Is it normal to give it up?

Among the many thousands of parents who have shared their estrangements with me, many say they have lost all hope of ever reconnecting in any significant way. Some go so far as to say they hope their child never tries. Or have even been contacted but turned their son or daughter away. Often, these parents are troubled by their feelings.

One parent whose son initiated estrangement admitted she hopes he’ll never try to return. Over several years of torment, her son duped her out of large sums of money that derailed her retirement. He even threatened to murder her. His estrangement came as a relief. After several months, she still suffers ill effects to her health, has trouble sleeping, and is sometimes plagued by the feeling that she must be to blame. Although she is relieved over his estrangement and honest that she’s given up the hope of ever having a relationship with him, those feelings trouble her. In her medical profession, hope is encouraged, so to personally experience a loss of hope cuts deep, slashing at her ideals.

This mother didn’t choose the estrangement, but because her son did, she’s since experienced a level of peace in her everyday life that wasn’t possible when her son remained in contact. She’s no longer awakened by hostile rantings and threats, and is no longer manipulated into financially rescuing her son.

It’s not difficult to understand why her son’s estrangement is liberating. This mother is similar to a couple in their seventies who, after years of verbal abuse and episodic estrangements initiated by their son and his wife, have decided that they will no longer allow him back into their lives. The pain of losing their grandchildren yet again, and of suffering their son’s vicious verbal tirades has taken its toll. Exhausted, these parents have chosen to savor their older years together, thankful for some peace. They’re no longer always on edge, in a perpetual state of fear. Their hope now rests with the grandchildren, whom they’re optimistic will one day contact them and pick up the loving relationship they cultivated during the “on” years of their on-and-off relationship controlled by their estranged son.

These parents cut off the prospect of further distress. Their reasoning aligns with the thoughts of philosopher Friedrich Nietzche, who calls hope “the most evil of evils, because it prolongs man’s torment.”3

No hope when nothing has changed

One father recently sent me an email, telling about his experience during six years of estrangement from his son. This loving father who had tried to have a good relationship with his son had been holding out hope. He fully expected that if his son did ever return to him, life lessons would have helped him mature—similar to the prodigal son who returned with a changed heart. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen. This father welcomed his estranged son into his home, but within a few minutes, the son proceeded to list what he saw as his father’s faults. He blamed his father for all of the problems in his life, and also the estrangement.

Reminded of the old turmoil—as compared with the relative peace during the six-year estrangement—this father told his son to leave and never come back. And then he sent me an email, wondering if it is common for parents to put an end to a relationship with an abusive son.

The answer is yes.

I hear from parents at all stages of estrangement: a week of no contact, one year, five years, or even decades. While it’s true that the majority say they wish they could have a good relationship, many admit to having lost all hope. Some for reasons like the parents above. Others because a son or daughter is now a stranger. Many explain why they know that a normal relationship isn’t possible, and they no longer want to try—yet are still plagued by sadness and worry their loss of hope represents some personal shortcoming.

Hope: Against the odds?

In the first example, the mother spoke of hope as integral in her work. Hope helps people who are suffering, often in situations that are largely out of their control. That’s how the idea of maintaining hope differs from optimism about more self-determined outcomes. We “hope” that there will be no traffic. We “hope” our surgery will go well. We “hope” that a friend with cancer survives. Other than the obvious things we might do to help these situations along, such as leave at low-traffic times or choose a reputable doctor, the outcomes are mostly beyond our control.

Hoping an estrangement will end is normal, but it’s also wise to accept that the outcome is beyond our control. Some parents can see that in their situation, it also isn’t likely. For them, leaving hope behind makes sense in order to stop the torment of continued hurt.

The couple in their seventies who are optimistic their grandchildren will one day reconnect make a distinction between hope and optimism. The oldest was 14 when the last estrangement began. They still send cards to her and her younger siblings, although they can’t be sure they’re receiving them. They reason that their granddaughter was old enough to see that her father’s bad behavior wasn’t their fault.

Limits are unique

We each decide our own limits as to how much trouble, abuse, or neglect we will accept in estrangement and still hope for reconciliation. In my book, there is a series of questions that help individuals conclude for themselves where they fall in the spectrum. Sometimes, taking a hard look at the realities of the relationship dynamics helps parents come to terms with what is, and move forward in their own lives—whether holding out hope or not.

If you’re troubled by your lack of hope or your decision to close the door to reconciliation, you’re not alone. As parents, we’re accustomed to caring for our children. For parents, sometimes the lines between childhood and adulthood can blur. An adult who has caused us repeated troubles may trigger the love we felt for a child who made a mistake. But that’s not the same as an adult son or daughter whose mistakes aren’t innocent or childlike.

Eventually, to protect their physical strength, their sanity, and their future, many parents draw the line—which is a healthy self-preservation response. Many of these parents say they wish they’d have done so sooner.

estrangementHope for ourselves

“Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.” ~ Desmond Tutu

As I say in my book, the landscape of loss is fertile ground for growth. When it comes to a happy future, we have more than hope. We can be optimistic and cultivate the fruits of our positive expectations with action. We can control our thoughts, our behavior, and for the most part, our lives. We can be happy, despite loss.

My hope is that all the caring parents who have been mistreated and estranged will make the most of their treasured lives.

References:

  1. Bury, S.M., Wenzel, M., Woddyatt, L. (2016). Giving hope a sporting chance: Hope as distinct from optimism when events are possible but not probable. Motivation & Emotion. 40:588-601
  2. Dal Sook, K., Hesook, S.K., Thorne, S. (2017). An Intervention model to help clients to seek their own hope experiences: The Narrative communication model of hope seeking intervention. Korean Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care. 20(1):1-7.
  3. Nietszche, F. (1994). Human, all too human. London, UK: Penguin Books.

Related articles:

Adult children won’t talk to you: What does it mean to cope?

Parents abandoned by adult children: Shape your new normal

 

Join the newsletter

Pine 300x225

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit

4 thoughts on “Estrangement: What about hope?

  1. IL

    Since my estranged daughter’s extreme passive-aggressive behavior and actions appear malicious, and since she is attaching herself more and more to these types of behaviors and actions and is not inclined to make changes in her life, I feel that it is best to hold out no hope for reconciliation with her. In my opinion, a realistic mind-set is best. My hope is to move on and successfully become conpletely estranged from her.

    Reply
  2. Grace

    I feel like I’ve done everything I could—and, yes, we’ve reached the point were it is all out of our control. I even wrote to my daughter that I’d do whatever it took to reconcile—lest I was missing the point and NOT doing everything I could or should.

    It’s no longer about me (or my husband or younger daughter), it is the estranging older daughter. We have, as a friend of mine describes it, let go with love.

    Reply
  3. Maureen D.

    “Hoping an estrangement will end is normal, but it’s also wise to accept that the outcome is beyond our control. Some parents can see that in their situation, it also isn’t likely. For them, leaving hope behind makes sense in order to stop the torment of continued hurt.” What a great paragraph you wrote Sheri! As I read & contribute to these heartfelt stories of lives affected by tales of parents trying to accept the new normal, which was never expected, of adult children who act out in ways we wish they didn’t happen, but oh they happen. I find no comfort learning that others are faced with some people that they love are behaving in unacceptable ways. Its great to know I’m not alone though! This really is difficult to discuss, but reading & writing is magical. Hope for me, is too dreamy & impractical. I want something more tangible, concrete even. I am @ a point where I accept the circumstances, it doesn’t mean I like it, I just cannot put any more energy into something that never materializes. And wishing & hoping are lending a preoccupation to empty spaces in my heart where ground is fertile for festering to take hold in a profound & negative way. Way passed anger, passed hurt, passed upset. Acceptance is the place I want to be. I am no longer in the process of letting go. I let go! And I won’t look back. I have been disappearing from my son’s life for a long time & today I revived me back into my life!!! HELLO, WELCOME. A new day & a new beginning! RELIEF!!! It will be my son’s birthday in 2 days & I will NOT call, I will not ask what would you like me to do? I will invite anything. I will, for once, do NOTHING! Goodbye to the old ways of being & hello to the new me!!! And I do not feel ugly, low or vindictive. I feel liberated & free! Wonderful!

    Reply
  4. Jill I.

    As I read all the comments, yes, I also feel sad that others are going through the same but to feel like there are people who would understand, I am not alone.
    Every person’s storey I have read is like reading my own.
    I have been through the despair, the questioning of ” what did I do?” “Why has this happened?”
    To the “live in HOPE ”
    6 years on after a really horrible few months where I nearly lost the plot completely because I would torture myself with questions, self doubt, failure as a mother I made up my mind, I was NOT going to spend another moment living in HOPE and paying out on my partner and other family members who tried to comfort me .
    No more hope, well, not for the relationship anyway, it is out for of my control. What will be will be. Time for me to stop paying out on those who love me, time for me to get on with the rest of my life ( 63 years old)
    This was not what I ever thought would happen, not in a million years, but it has..have tried everything, her twin sister has also, her grandparents( who helped look after her children so she could go to university) there were other grandchildren I was watching, one of which had type one diabetes ( her mum was also at university), and so my mum and I split the duties cause I couldn’t be in 2 suburbs at once and mum couldn’t cope with the diabetes side of things. Anyway, the storey goes on and one…but like I said, my hope has gone and has been replaced with acceptance that this is is what it is. I can also now say for the FIRST TIME since ALL THIS HAPPENED that ” I do not deserve to be treated this way!”
    We all do the best we can at the time, there is no manual, as parents we fly by the seat of our pants often thinking we will do this parent thing different to our parents ( in some cases) and so we do, and guess what, still not enough.
    The only place now for hope in my world is that I “hope” my daughter, her family are safe .
    Funny, after my 6 year awakening I kept saying to myself….”I am so done with crying” then one day I was looking on the internet for SOMETHING, and low and behold i stumbled onto a site for rejected parents and a book called……” DONE WITH CRYING”
    Nothing happens by coincidence , it was MY TIME to be DONE WITH CRYING.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Website Protected by Spam Master