Five ways to cope with the holidays when adult children are “no contact”

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60 thoughts on “Five ways to cope with the holidays when adult children are “no contact”

  1. Anon

    Good advice on the list. Thank you. One reason that I’m estranged from my children now was I had a spiritual awakening and am grateful that I get to spend this time of year quietly, peacefully. Praying for peace and learning and creating. At times I feel a bit guilty as it feels selfish but I’ve given so much to them and others in the past 50+ years and am grateful to be able to give this time to myself. Looking forward to inevitable changes as I will be moving from the house I raised my 2 children in and starting over in a big way, further away from them.

    Reply
  2. Susan

    Thank you Sheri for this very helpful video. I love the quicksand illustration! It’s perfect!

    We’re in our 70’s and have hosted Christmas for most of the 50 years we’ve been happily married. We have 3 adult children in their mid-late 40’s. This was the first year we’ve been entirely alone on Thanksgiving and will be on Christmas too. Just the two of us.

    We have been totally estranged from our oldest daughter and her children for 16 years. It took years, prayers, and buckets of tears to come to accepting it on moving on.

    But now we have also become estranged from our youngest daughter and her family whom we were very close to all these years. The reason was because
    our son and daughter-in-law (who live in another state) whom we’ve always been very close to, recently divorced after a long marriage. He was clearly at fault and it was demanded that we take sides and reject and shun him. We refused to take sides and when he reached out to us in suicidal desperation for emotional support we were condemned and cut off for helping him. Neither we nor he have ever tried to justify his bad behavior.

    So now we’ve lost all 6 of our grandchildren, 2 daughters, and a daughter/in/law who is like a daughter. All we have is our prodigal son who doesn’t live near but who loves and respects us. What a mess!

    Ironically, both he and the daughter who recently defected have always told us we were great parents, that their upbringing was a happy one, and that their other sibling is off her rocker for walking out of the family.

    But there you have it. Just like we’ve gone from hosting lovely and happy Christmas gatherings for decades to being abandoned at a time in our lives when our health is declining and all our friends and siblings are dying.

    We didn’t bother with all the usual decorations and are keeping Christmas quiet and simple. We’ll go to church, eat more than we should, and enjoy the sweet little Carolers coming to sing for us tomorrow.

    Though heartbroken, I’m actually looking forward to not having all the work. It’s exhausting, and especially since I deal with a chronic illness.

    Try to have a Merry Christmas folks. God has given us so many blessings if we just open our eyes to them.

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Just found you and I got your audiobook and ordered the workbook. I didn’t realize I was going to need your advice but here I am. Lost my son to suicide over 15 years ago, and now my one daughter is holding me hostage to her emotional problems and has recruited her sister — my only other child and her husband. I am not going to let them bully me into living my life by their terms. I’ve survived too much to let anyone rob me of my peace and even joy which I did not know I could have without my children in my life. It is doable. I’m not excited about it, but I mean to survive and try to carry out God’s will for my life. God bless.

    Reply
    1. Toni D.

      Dear Anonymous,
      Thank you for sharing your experience. You deserve to have peace. I am glad you found this site and Sheri’s books. I reread parts of them often to remind myself I did not cause nor do I deserve this. But regardless I can have a pleasant, meaningful life.
      You deserve that, too.
      Hugs,
      Toni

      Reply
  4. Cheryl D.

    Sheri,
    Everything in your Nov 2323 video was spot on. I read both your books and subscribed to your newsletter after my 41 year old daughter suddenly and unexpectedly ceased all communication with myself and our entire extended family. I’ve not been able to see, hear or communicate in any way with my three grandchildren, now ages 4, 6, & 8. Although she’s always lived in another state since her marriage, I was present during the birth of her children (2 were home births). We were extremely close, talking several times during the week. We visited each other regularly, but usually I traveled to help her while she raised her young family. Her estrangement began a month before Mother’s Day a year and a half ago.
    Until recently I was beating myself up for mistakes I’d made during her childhood, but (thanks to your words of encouragement) I realize I did the best I could. She is bi-polar and her father coincidentally relocated to live near her after he retired, shortly before the estrangement occurred. He sees the family now on a regular basis. He said directly to me recently at the graduation party for my other daughters high school senior “I hate you. I wish you were dead”. We’ve been divorced for 30 years. So, there’s that.
    My current husband of 20 years doesn’t approve of my estranged daughters lifestyle and political views. Your books, newsletter, and group sharing continue to be important in my healing process. I didn’t know where to turn for help when this happened to me and my family. My other daughter and her children remain close and we were all together for thanksgiving. I had 20 family members in my home this year where my daughter and I cooked thanksgiving dinner. I’m very grateful for many things, but I think next year I’ll let someone else host. Maybe I’ll just make a pot of soup!
    Many, many thanks for your wisdom and enlightenment.
    Cheryl

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      We have a lot in common. This was my first ever holiday without my children. I am preparing myself for Christmas without them as well. God bless you!

      Reply
      1. Shawlana

        Dear Anonymous,
        I am giving myself permission this year to not be the Happy Holiday Hostess. In my city the zoo is open on Christmas Day and that’s where I’m going.

        Reply
  5. Peony

    Hi Sheri,

    This was the first Thanksgiving that I was able to thoroughly enjoy without the anchor weight of estrangement around my neck. Not even one minute was spent in feeling loss or pity for myself. Apparently, five years of grief was enough. I have a lot to be grateful for as my husband and I move forward in building the life we deserve. No more waiting for the good times to come in some distant future place that may never arrive….the good times are NOW! I thank you for your posts, and will continue viewing them to get out ahead of any potential pitfalls. I wish you a healthy and happy holiday season!

    Reply
  6. Fred

    Hello everyone. I am glad that some of you seem to be able to heal and move forward in life. Some of us should escape this awful pain. I do not have any hope for myself. I lost my children to divorce when they were 1 and 3. Just a year after I lost my own Father at just 56. My wife would not tolerate my grief. I was a good Father. I only had my sons every other weekend but I tried hard to make the most of it. paid over $500,000 in child support, never missed a payment. Even though I had an incredibly demanding job I made it to most of their ballgames and spelling bees and all that sort of stuff. My younger son threw me away a little over 3 years ago now. I have no idea why. I taught him how to drive and bought him a car and he drove away never to talk to me again. I thought I had a good relationship with my older son until his last year of college. He would not tell me anything about why his brother would not talk to me though 🙁 And out of the blue threw me away too after I became angry about the way he was treating his grandmother. I have not heard from him in over a year and he will not reply to my messages or calls. So now I am alone, a failed Father having wasted the better part of my life in a rat race to pay for children who would never give a crap about me. I do not believe it is possible to come to terms with this or to ever end the pain I have been in now for 20 years since my divorce. My children have made certain the pain will never end until I do. Anyways, I am glad that some of you are able to find help and solutions and support. Not all of us should be lost. I do not know why I am writing this, maybe just to get it all down somewhere. Take care.

    Reply
    1. Jan K

      My dear Fred, my heart goes out to you. You don’t deserve such treatment
      (and neither do most of us). I don’t think any of us truly heal…that is why we still visit this website. I personally compartmentalise my grief and lead quite a happy and contented life…but every now and then I feel overcome with grief and know that unless I quickly focus on something else I will end up sobbing. I just refuse, and can’t see the point of, spending the rest of my life in misery so I try to keep upbeat. I know how you must feel about the financial commitment you made which now seems pointless but at least you know you did the right thing. Maybe one day your sons will realise when they have their own children what a reliable and supportive father you were. I sincerely hope you have a new partner you can share your life with but whatever your position from here on concentrate on your own happiness. You have a lot of life left to live so make the most of it. I wish you so much happiness…

      Reply
      1. nancy K

        I had just ordered my son fudge for Christmas, among other things.. Up pops the story about writing a letter to try and reconcile. My son is bi-polar for the last twelve years and in the last three years has stopped all communication. I never know if anything I send has been received. I know I keep doing this over and over to try to get a response. Thank-you for the article. I cancelled the fudge and saved myself some money. I have adopted a needy puppy and he has actually made me laugh. I did not know how to laugh any more. My puppy has given me more joy and contentment than I have had for years. And, guess what? He loves me just for me. You can’t beat that!

        Reply
    2. MARLENE

      Oh my. What a lovely and honest man…you appear to be.

      I feel, as a woman, very similar…it’s been basically 16 years…my daughter…will be 34. Eats at my soul… every day. I was a good mom…I truly believe…not perfect…but I’m human. But a good mom…not different than most moms, I know.

      I hate the holidays and my world is just so empty. So, I’m feeling like you, Fred.
      I’ll pray…for both of us. And celebrate for those who CAN TRY and move forward.

      Reply
    3. Diane H.

      Fred, you are not a failure as a father, in fact, you sound outstanding. Your sons are currently failing as your sons. I hope that changes for you, but in the meantime, you are still a father. Live your life in such a way that your sons may later look at your life and see from your example how to deal positively with rejection and pain. Be the star of your life – be your own hero. Have fun, treat yourself with respect and care. That’s what tough people do when the going gets tough. There really is no choice if you choose to live well.

      Reply
    4. Ester

      Hi Fred. Find things to get involved in. Meet other single people. Stay busy. Check with your community center for a hobby. You deserve to now do for YOU!

      Reply
  7. Cathie S.

    My daughter is 51 years old. When she was 17
    Years old, I came home from work and all her things were gone and so was she. My husband and I were devastated. We had no idea anything was wrong.. She came back in to our life, married and had a baby girl.. She got divorced but was still close to us. When she was about 30, she married a man 9 years her senior, He had a very small family and his mother had died.. He was an alcoholic ,very jelaous, verbally abusive to my daughter and grandaughter. My daughter no longer has contact with me. Her father died in 2012 and that affected her greatly. I no longer attempt to communicate with her but it breaks my heart.

    Reply
  8. Vickie

    Yes the struggle continues as first one then the other decide how to be mean during the holidays. I can’t begin to tell you. I am holding the family together with Prayer and the meanness and yelling and insults are almost more than one can bare

    Reply
  9. Carleen

    There are so many comments where I wish I had the like, love or care emojis. I don’t always feel like commenting but sure wish there was a way to let people know other people saw their comments just so as to let them know they’re not alone.

    Reply
  10. Lois H.

    Thank you for your loving, spot on wisdom. I found your voice so soothing and healing. I like the idea to prepare for the new year and to visualize what I want. I appreciate your passion to help us through this circumstance with our daughters/sons. I struggle with the day after Thanksgiving. It’s a let down for me. I am taking it easy today and listening to music that I love. May you feel better and able to enjoy your holidays.

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      Thank you, Lois. Yes, there can be a letdown the day after! Glad you’re giving yourself a break. I’m thinking about next year right with you!

      Thank you for your kindness.

      Hugs,
      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
    2. Brenda R.

      In my experience it’s not the actual holiday that causes the feelings of abandonment and rejection. It”s a cockamaimee notion that mothers are somehow miraculously capable of shopping, cleaning, cooking, baking decorating, and presenting a festival meal single handedly in an atmosphere of peace, comfort and joy for a bunch of hung-over rowdy party animals and hungery gamblers with guilty consciences.

      Reply
  11. Elaine M

    Hello Sheri and all us rejected parents!
    I watched this yesterday and wanted to let you know how much it has helped me. My 28-year-old daughter rejected me three years ago in September. She now lives in another state and married last year and I wasn’t invited. I still don’t know what I did to her. She was always the type of girl you had to walk on eggshells around, I always had to filter my responses to her or I would get a scathing remark. So, in a way, that is a relief, that I don’t have to do that anymore. My other children, a younger daughter and son, love me and think I am a great mom, although they are out of the house. But I do miss my oldest daughter terribly. I sent her money the first Christmas she rejected me, and no response. I sent her a letter last year after a very vivid dream, and no response. So I am done crying and trying. I have started to foster kittens, and the way they run around the house, and in a way it feels like young grandchildren running about having fun. It gives me great comfort. Now Christmas is coming, but I am prepared.

    Reply
    1. Carol

      She could be a narcissist. That is a tough personality disorder to deal with. I followed the advice of several you tube people / experts on this subject and it has worked out to a reasonable degree. What is hard to swallow and do..is to change ourselves. I use the gray rock method and I make sure I never ever challenge, disagree or criticize. There are phrases I learned to use. It was either this or a no contact relationship. In other words.. no parenting. Wishing you the best. Every relationship is different. I just chose to love her this way whether she deserves it or not.

      Reply
  12. Valerie S.

    Parents have the hardest job in existence, especially in today’s world. I bless my children, wish them success, peace and happiness. I hope they don’t plan on any inheritance. I’m spending it and giving away what’s left.
    No hard feelings. Life is what it is.

    Reply
  13. DIANA R.

    My daughter has been estranged for several years but I am doing well with the realization both of us would need to connect again, not only me. My question is, why is this happening to so many of us parents? What is going on?

    Reply
  14. Anonymous

    Mine are not only estranged but I live alone. Today is awful and nothing will help. This is my third holiday season completely alone. I have grown away from my social circles because it was just too hard being around families.

    Reply
  15. David P.

    Hi Sheri,
    Thanks for a wonderful video. (Did you know we cannot expand the screen like on YouTube? It was a small image but your voice and message were strong and clear, in spite of your cold. You are yet again a trooper helping us estranged parents!)
    This Thanksgiving and the holidays, as I emailed you yesterday and thanks again for your reply, will be my saddest yet as I give up hope on both my estranged daughters. I still write to one of them, but think it may be time to stop. I am meditating on your essay a while back on the Myth of Closure. The pain will never go away but with the lessons in this video, there are ways to move ahead.
    One way I’m focusing on now is the traditional message of Thanksgiving. We still have so much to be thankful for. I have a new wife who is one of the most wonderful women I have ever known, supportive, clever, enterprising, and beautiful. Almost three years ago I got one of the best jobs of my life, which I hope to hold until I retire in a year or two. I have 95% recovered from a dangerous heart attack in 2018, where a stent from a doctor at 3 in the morning saved my life. I have a pretty and cozy house in a friendly, middle-class neighborhood in a scenic forested area, near one of the nicest cities in central Florida. I have a few old friends I’m in contact with, and I volunteer with great people in an organization called Convention of States to amend the Constitution, and fix the federal government. All these positive things keep me going, plus my great jazz and classic rock collection on CD and college football on Saturdays.
    There is much to be grateful for. And that includes you. The more I look at things, I consider you a national treasure. Maybe you should expand your sphere of influence, appear on a talk show or something? I truly believe there are more people you can be helping.
    Have a great Thanksgiving,
    David

    Reply
    1. Mo J.

      Amen David P! You sound like you got your ‘ship’ together. I applaud you for seeing the bigger picture and hope that soon, I will be in the same situation. Cheerz.

      Reply
  16. Lisa R.

    Dear Travel Companions,

    I wish you all a peaceful Thanksgiving. Give yourself a hug today and know that you are not alone on this journey.

    A special note of appreciation to Sheri. Thank you so much for all you do and never feel apologetic about delays in communication or anything! Please just feel better.

    I am grateful for all of you here.

    Lisa R.

    Reply
  17. Judy

    Thank you for the video! It helped me so much. I felt so alone. I had no idea help was available. My only son has been estranged for 7 months now. He has not responded to me and has now blocked my number. I found this out today. I think it’s time I need to move on. I’ll need help doing that and feel better just knowing you are there.

    Reply
    1. Gina T.

      Just wanted to reach out when I saw my only son. I’m in the same boat my only son has no contact with me as well. Felt his absence on Thanksgiving, don’t understand how he can operate like this. Couldn’t even get a Happy Thanksgiving text.

      Reply
  18. Kati

    Grateful, an interesting concept. I would get my thesaurus out and hunt down some synonyms. But I’m sitting in a chemo chair right now, so not inclined to do so. Diagnosed in 2017. Also, in a cast as I broke my right ankle, required surgery involving 14 screws, 2 plates, and several rods. In a wheelchair for over 2 months. Still another 6 weeks of PT and learning to walk to go.
    Strained relationship with middle child since his marriage. Wife is a trust fund baby, and we are lowly middle classes, who managed as best as we could. Middle son became estranged in 2021. No contact at all, not allowed to see or speak to grandchildren. Don’t know why. But have the suspicion we just aren’t good enough.
    Youngest child, became estranged in the beginning of 2022. Her estrangement makes more sense. She is trans, and I believe her estrangement is as a result of wanting to start this life as a new being. But wish I knew for sure.
    Oldest child is our rock. She has come to accept us, warts and all, as the humans that we are.
    So yes, I am grateful, thankful even. I am grateful for her and the family she has created. I am grateful for my husband (that I occasionally want to harm.)
    I will never get to the point my mother got to, when as a 14 year naive teen, asked about what we were doing for Thanksgiving. My mother, having lost your 45 year old husband just 6 months earlier, looked me in the eye and said she was grateful for nothing! Imagine my horror. I was nothing!
    Even though we are estranged,I will always to grateful for having my children in my life, no matter how short the time. I just hope I will live long enough for them to figure out that I will always love them,no matter what!
    So don’t dwell on the past, live in the now, and give hope for the future.

    Reply
  19. Kristy R.

    Shari, your holiday video on coping with the holidays and making a list is so good! Your words in a previous article “There are no “right” words when someone is determined to take whatever you say “wrong” resonated with me and I now have that on my phone to remind me at times. We go through a valley with estrangment and if we keep putting one step in front of the other we will make it to the other side where there is light. It doesn’t seem like it at the time but life is ever evolving and changing. There was a time that my husband and I thought we might never be happy again. Moving to sunshine in another state over a year ago has been healing. for us both. We were depressed, anxious, walking on eggshells and suffering from abuse from our 2 daughters which was affecting our health. They possessed control over our relationship with our grand children who we helped take care of from 3 months until their early teens when their parents worked. We basically lived for family attending all their sports, events and celebrations which so many of us do, usually being put last after their needs were meant. Of course not having that special relationship with our grandchildren now is one of the hardest things to endure. We have made new friends and we walk, swim, bike and take care of ourselves. Beauty and wildlife surrounds us and the simplest things like watching the beautiful birds in our backyard at our feeders or puttering with my plants makes us happy. Keeping busy, attending a happy church and giving it to God and being grateful to God every day for his many blessings helps so much. We wil share Thanksgiving with friends and I volunteer at our animal shelter and will volunteer on Christmas day and will have peace. The one thing that we have to remember especially if our estranged kids are doing well is that they are living their lives and going along and we have the choice to let our precious lives go by and miss out on all it has to offer or find enjoyment and peace. I have cancer and I choose to live and hopefully someday before it’s too late our family may be reunited but if they come back I want them to see a Mom who has loved life, has always been kind, has done good things and is a stronger woman because of them. Much love to all those who are struggling, please be good to yourself and find something that gives you joy and happiness and satisfaction. Happy Hollidays.

    Reply
  20. Ann

    Sherri,
    I can’t thank you enough for being so open, and for putting a name to our feelings of being rejected by our adult children. I am partially through the book, “Done with the Crying” and I am seeing that I’m not alone in this. My daughter was molesting by her stepfather, (my husband), 35 years ago, and has just come forth with that information. I left my husband, thinking that would help my daughter to feel like I was supportive of her, but she remains distanced from me. She attends mediation sessions with me and I’m hoping that will eventually help. My son has gradually pulled away, and now there is no contact.
    I have another daughter, son-in-law, and adorable 1 year old granddaughter. They are my islands of peace and love.
    I am not hosting the usual Christmas Eve family celebration this year. I don’t have it in me. I think I will simply send gifts to the grandchildren. They are helpless victims in this situation.
    Again, thank you for this forum for expression of our feelings.

    Reply
  21. Cheryl H.

    This video was so good! The five key points are so good to implement as best you can. I am also just beginning in your book and so far it makes so much sense. I have two estranged daughters, that live together in the same house. My other children, who are married, and one of them engaged, are all going to their significant others, families for Thanksgiving. I always cook a big dinner for everyone on Thanksgiving. But this year I am just staying home and making a pot of homemade soup. This will be good therapy for me, considering I’ve cooked Thanksgiving for the past 45 years. I will be able to spend quiet cooking time. Thanking God for all that he’s gotten me through this year.

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      The soup sounds wonderful! Yes, the kitchen is “medicinal” in so many ways. Enjoy your quiet time. (P.S. I need your soup while getting over my “cold.”)

      Hugs,
      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
    2. Darlene R.

      Dear Sheri,
      It’s been over a year since I last sent you a post following the estrangement of my son. Absolutely, the worst year of my life. My only solace is knowing I tried to reconnect a few time but to no avail, each message was ignored. I had hoped that enough time had passed and maybe, just maybe he would respond. My last message was on November 21st. he saw it, ignored it, and it’s painfully obvious that he’s not going to respond. I can either keep sending messages every other month or, let go!…I am finally ready to do just that, it only took a year to have it sink in. I’ve come through the worst of it, now it’s time for me again. Your 5 things are exactly what I needed to hear. Of course I will still have some down days but I’m finding that it’s getting easier to cope with each day that passes. Doesn’t mean I will ever stop loving/missing my son, but it’s time I started loving myself more. Thank you Sheri …Happy Holidays & Merry Christmas

      Reply
  22. Lita

    Thank you Sheri. Thank you for sharing some helpful tips during my difficult time. There are o.k. days and there are horrendous days. Despite these on-off days, I know that I need to take control of my own destiny. I recently bought your book. It has helped me to cope with my own recent estrangement from my own adult boys. I just don’t understand and am trying to. The stories I have read in your book closely resemble mine. Thank you for your encouragement and kind words. Only those walking in our shoes can truly understand the pain and suffering a parent experiences when a child decides to break ties for no apparent reason. I still don’t understand! But your book has done a whirl of good to help me navigate such difficult times. Thank you again.

    Reply
  23. Terrie K.

    Dear Sheri:

    Don’t apologize for not feeling well, just take care of yourself and get better.

    Happy Thanksgiving and thank you for all your words of wisdom for us all!

    Reply
  24. MissusPete

    I love the bits of humor that you inject along the way in this very relevant topic (…”they have to clear the shelves for Valentines Day”!), and I love the kitty pictures, being a cat fanatic. I miss my daughter terribly, but during the holidays, my heart especially aches for my beloved late husband. My daughter chose to walk away from me, but my loyal husband would have never made that choice. In an odd way, his loss has helped me cope better with losing my daughter.

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      MissusPete,

      I’m so sorry for the loss of your beautiful husband–and I absolutely love the way you have chosen a perspective on it that helps you to cope with your daughter’s decisions. (And thank you for liking my humor.)
      🙂
      Hugs,
      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
  25. Imogen R.

    Thank you for this Sheri. I’ve been estranged from my only daughter for 17 months and I’ve been receiving your newsletters for most of that time but I’ve never been able to read any of your articles all the way through because they always make me cry. This was different though – I was able to watch the presentation from start to finish, and I made notes. Maybe I need more of my senses to be engaged to stop me from getting distracted and upset. Whatever the reason, this format worked for me and I hope you’ll continue with it!
    I’m bracing myself for my fourth Christmas all alone (two due to the pandemic and one due to estrangement) so I’ve some idea of how I’m going to feel and what I’m going to do, but I’ll take on board some of your suggestions and change things up a bit this year. Thanks again, and Happy Holidays. Imogen

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      Imogen,
      Thank you for writing this. I am working on quite a few new formats and ideas and “experiences” for people, and it’s good to hear that something worked for you when the written material feels too tough to stick with to the end. New formats help me “stretch” and learn, and anyway, thank you!

      You may be alone in your home for Christmas … but there are thousands and thousands of people in similar situations. I hope you will all raise a toast to one another (of whatever drink you want). I believe the energy of fellow feeling and care will find its way into rooms around the world.

      Hugs,
      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
  26. Jordan

    Hi Sheri,

    Thank you for your kind and inspirational words to help us enjoy the holidays with increased awareness and joy.
    Happy Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year!!

    All the best, Jordan

    Reply
  27. Elizabeth V

    Thank you. A much needed video message! Your message regarding continuing to lament what has happened versus living my life really hit home for me. It was one of those moments where I realized 8 years has already gone by and I am no further along in my healing from the gut wrenching pain I have experienced from my cherished and treasured adult daughter and son-in-law condemning, judging and dismissing me. I appreciate the encouragement to begin now to ponder what brings me joy and how I can intentionally live the one fleeting life I have been given in this new coming year. I matter! Psalm 139:14

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      Yes, Elizabeth V., you do matter.

      I hope you will share as you continue forward and find more ways to enjoy YOUR life.

      Hugs to you, and thank you for writing.

      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
  28. Marci

    Thank you so much for your video. This will be my first holiday with my daughter who chose to cut off all contact this past spring. Although admittedly it was not a tremendous surprise as estrangement was the final nail to the passive aggressiveness, silent treatment and the like. But your video was a wonderful reminder at self care . I have my list of movies and books that give me joy.

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      Marci,

      I need to get my own list of books and movies done, so thank you for sharing that you have yours completed! Feel like that’s a little kick in the tush for me!
      🙂

      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
  29. Jennifer D.

    Thank you so much! Your books, videos, articles, support group, and all you have done has helped me so much! I have come so far since my son Seth who is 26 years old has left me an estranged parent. I love him and always will but, with all your help I know I need to take care of myself and move forward. It’s been over a year since I tried contacting him and I know it’s best. I just wanted to take a moment and wish you a very safe and happy holidays with your family and thank you for helping live again! God bless you and your loved ones!

    Reply
    1. rparents Post author

      Jennifer,
      Thank you for your note. I want to say that your words, “… and I know it’s best” are lovely to hear. You can trust yourself and you are. Beautiful.

      Hugs,
      Sheri McGregor

      Reply
  30. angela

    Good commonsense advice. Thanks for your efforts on behalf of this community! My advice: If the Holidays are too saturated with grief, think about taking a trip. Be sure that it’s with other people. There are lots of group trips that cater to solo travelers over the Holidays. River cruises in Europe, or other group activities that are closer to home.

    Reply

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