Every Cloud Has a “Silver Lining”

Viewing 25 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #12887
      AvatarMountainview
      Participant

      I have had the pleasure of travelling all around the world for business and leisure. When flying at a cruising altitude of up to 39,000 feet or more, there’s a sense of ethereal calmness being above the heavenly clouds, and looking out the window there’s a seemingly peaceful and magical place called planet Earth down below.

      Yet, we know reality – sadly so –down below, on precious planet Earth, there is war, terrorism, genocide, kidnappings, torture, hunger, famine, poverty, homelessness, droughts, fires, explosions, floods, hurricanes, typhoons, tornadoes, landslides, earthquakes, accidents, human trafficking, sex slavery, child exploitation, drug trafficking, homicides, suicides, rapes, mutilations, and countless accounts of human rights violations and injustices. I think of the poor children in India who survive by eating rotten garbage from landfills; or those poor African children who were orphaned because their parents were slaughtered by barbaric militants or whose parents have died because of an epidemic disease. I think of the young, vulnerable teenage girls who, against their will, were sold into arranged marriages to much older men. There’s no end and no shortage in suffering, be it through natural causes or man-made cruelty and disasters. Indeed, there is an endless supply of atrocities occurring all around the world as we speak – it truly can be very depressing just thinking about it.

      In light of this knowledge and the undeniable global suffering, I often wondered how “senseless” and silly it is for privileged adult children to choose to abandon and estrange from their loving parents who cared for them, nurtured them, educated them, and sacrificed everything to provide their children with a better future. Absence of any form of actual abuse, cruelty or neglect, it truly appears “senseless” for adult children, who in spite of having received unconditional parental love and a very good childhood, decided nonetheless they’ve had enough of mom or dad.

      6 months ago, when our nearly 30 year-old daughter, and shortly after, our son decided to abandon us, one of the first words that came to our mind (besides the obvious first word and burning question of “Why?”) was our daughter’s favorite word – “Seriously?”

      My husband and I were in total shock and disbelief…”Seriously?”, “Why? “What Changed?” After nearly 30 years of a normal, healthy, supportive and loving parent-child relationship, we felt completely shocked, blindsided, betrayed, angry and very hurt. It just seemed “senseless”.

      My way of coping with this sudden abandonment experience was to study as much as possible about this estrangement phenomenon. Basically, I needed to know what are the root causes and reasons for adult children to abandon or estrange from their loving and kind parents – and is this a unique, isolated occurrence or is there some type of silent epidemic occurring on a wide-scale, global level?. Within 2 months I read 7 books and various blogs. In the end, I discovered Sheri’s website http://www.rejectedparents.net is by far the best virtual, global support group for estranged parents, and Sheri’s book “Done With The Crying: Help and Healing for Mothers of Estranged Adult Children” is by far the best, most in-depth study, and most comprehensive material I have ever read on this topic.

      There aren’t enough words to express the deepest gratitude towards Sheri for her amazing courage to share her experience and her infinite wisdom to shed light on this silent, painful phenomenon.

      As a result of the intense study, in just the last 6 months, we have already progressed quickly through the various stages of grief involving the sudden loss of our parent-child relationship.

      We have gone through the early phase of 1) shock and denial; 2) pain and guilt; 3) anger and bargaining; 4) depression, reflection, and feelings of loneliness; since then we have adjusted toward the 5) upward trend; we are 6) reconstructing and working through our lives; and we have found 7) new hope and acceptance for a new meaning in our short but treasured lives.

      Our initial visceral, emotional reaction of shock and denial regarding our adult children’s seemingly out-of-nowhere “senseless” behavior, has now been replaced with peaceful thoughts, a compassionate heart and an ethereal calmness that you feel when flying above the heavenly clouds.

      What we believed in the begging to be completely “senseless” – now makes perfect sense to us.

      There are in fact countless reasons as to why our adult children decide to abandon or estrange from their loving parents. Having this knowledge, it has freed our tormented souls, it has soothed our aching hearts, and it has completely liberated our spirits. We feel great and proud to have successfully accomplished one of the best jobs ever. Now we can smile and laugh at all the funny memories we once had as a family unit. And we can now look forward creating our own golden years’ memories.

      One of my favorite sayings is:

      “The Sun is Always Shining Upon Us – No Matter How Stormy Your Local Weather May Be”.

      This is Silver Lining message of hope to all my fellow mothers and father around the world.
      Stormy weather may come and go, this too shall pass. You deserve to be happy and to shine!

      Hugs and Kisses XOXOXOXOXO

      Your Fellow Mom and Friend – Mountainview

    • #12897
      AvatarLostinC
      Participant

      Thank you mountain view. I get stuck in the why. On one level I understand it on another I just don’t get it. How can this be I say so often. I miss my son and I can’t get over ( or. Haven’t gotten over yet) that he doesn’t care one wit about me. You sound so resolved. Thanks for being an example of peace above the clouds. Hope to meet you there someday. Lost in c

    • #12898
      AvatarJoyful
      Participant

      Mountainview,
      What took you 6 months to achieve, took me 20 years. I have finally arrived. I love my girls and confident I did my job. I can now move forward free of the pain of estrangement. I was very happy to read your success story. By the way…you are a great writer.
      Joyful

    • #12899
      AUSSIEMOMAUSSIEMOM
      Participant

      MOuntainview: Could you please go further with this: “There are in fact countless reasons as to why our adult children decide to abandon or estrange from their loving parents” and “Having this knowledge, it has freed our tormented souls, it has soothed our aching hearts, and it has completely liberated our spirits. ”

      And yes, when a flight is smooth, it’s very peaceful up there at 30,000 ft in the air but as a wife of a retired airline pilot, I can say ’tis not always peaceful’…turbulence can lie ahead. And this is about what I feel life is about….moments of peace, moment of turbulence. Moments of coping.

      If you can get this far in six months with your estrangement, I take my hat off to you, that is quite a remarkable achievement. I confess to be a lesser human being than that but I am trying. Compassion and letting go is what it’s all about…at our end, but the reasons, well, I wonder….I’m not sure I have the ability to completely ‘soar free’.
      Aussiemom

    • #12906
      rparentsrparents
      Keymaster

      Beautiful post, Mountain View. Thank you for your kind words about my book.

      Aussiemom and others…there’s a wise saying:

      Whether you think you can or you think you can’t … you’re right.

      Sheri McGregor

    • #12907
      rparentsrparents
      Keymaster

      Beautiful post, Mountain View. Thank you for your kind words about my book.

      Aussiemom and others…there’s a wise saying:

      Whether you think you can or you think you can’t … you’re right.

      Sheri McGregor

    • #12909
      AvatarJoyful
      Participant

      One of my breakthrough moments was when I realized I had suffered an unwanted divorced by my girls. I went through a divorce 30 years ago from a husband that left me for another woman. It took a long time to accept that he just no longer wanted me. I just wanted him back for a long time. I eventually accepted it years after he married her. This same reality hit me months ago about my girls and it helped me tremendously when I saw how much the same they were. It was like a light went on. It felt so so so good to accept after so much pain of living with the struggle and broken heart I no longer even care why they left. I am just happy. After that point, the troubling thoughts, heartache, torment and confusion began to melt away. I have a new life and my heart jumps for excitement when I think of it. Its so great!

      I always add that it is Jesus that brought me through and His love and power working in me that got me here. This joy in me is His Presence living in me and He brought me deliverance in every way.

    • #12915
      AvatarJoyful
      Participant

      Whether you think you can or you think you can’t … you’re right.

      I love this quote Sheri. I just always believed there was complete healing and a place of completed recovery. I found it and learning to maintain it in the way that works for me and that is the power of Christ. I am at the tail end of this and it still takes “some” consentrated effort at times to keep my mind headed in the right direction. It is getting easier as the days pass and the hurt is gone and the memory of the hurt is fading quickly. I honestly don ‘t care “why” anymore or that they chose to walk away. I have no more questions about them or about myself. I’m just glad its over.

    • #12920
      AvatarTC
      Participant

      Mountainview, I too have looked for the core reasons for why things are the way they are. It does help tremendously in coming to a peaceful life. My guess is your life is fulfilled in many ways which has helped fill the painful gap of no longer having your children in your life. That is the key for me – pushing and living a life as positive and productive as I can. To be 100% completely rid of the painful loss and all that went on up to that, probably will never happen. I might reach 99%, have closed the door, moved on to happier things but she is a part of me and I will always feel that loss.

    • #12922
      rparentsrparents
      Keymaster

      Let’s play with words. I challenge the thinking that the loss is something that’s always felt. Most of the time, I don’t even think about my estranged son anymore. When I do, it’s not often “loss” that even feel. It’s more like, oh yeah, he’s out there … I hope he’s enjoying his life.

      On some days, depending on circumstances, I might think more: Maybe someday I’ll see him…and gosh, not sure how that will go. Do I even want to? Well, lots of variables there. But here I am today in my immediate life, my present day–and there’s lots to think about here. Still don’t understand it all, but whatever. I wish him well, because that’s all I can do about it–wish him well, and honor myself, too.

      VERY occasionally, I might actually feel “loss.” But that’s usually when it’s holidays, it’s raining outside, there’s sappy music on the radio as I’m driving alone in my car and am extra tired, and maybe I’ve seen a homeless person on the street that kind of reminds me of my son for some reason … And then I wonder if he’s okay, and worry, and really do feel loss. I might even shed a tear or two. But then I figure out that it’s all the stuff–the holiday atmosphere with all the families, my exhaustion, the dreary rain, the idea of another year nearing an end, blah blah blah.

      I guess what I’m saying is that if you live in the present, you don’t get caught up in the loss. And if you’re feeling the loss, then look at your circumstances, and evaluate the feeling for what it is, why it’s hitting you, etc.

      Words do count. What you tell yourself matters.

      Love to all of you beautiful and kind parents. Support yourselves. Take a lesson from my dogs. Live in the moment, and enjoy each one. Yesterday is a memory. The future is uncertain. Today is all there is.

      Okay, that’s my “lecture” for the day.
      🙂

      Sheri McGregor

    • #12923
      AvatarTC
      Participant

      You’re right Sheri, it is not a loss felt every single minute of the day or even every day. For me “always” is that one can’t make “loss” permanently go away. I can’t make the feeling of the loss of my father go away. I miss him. That loss is always going to be there and I’m going to feel it from time to time. I can’t permanently make the feeling of the loss of my daughter go away. Living in the present and how consuming that loss feeling can be, is a different story.

    • #12925
      rparentsrparents
      Keymaster

      Absolutely!

      Sheri

    • #12927
      AvatarJoyful
      Participant

      I am overwhelmed as I read. My heart is forever grateful for the honesty, support and wisdom I have found on these pages. The book, the site, and every person here have been a significant part of my healing and recovery. I was validated and supported through all your thoughts and stories. Sheri’s book gave me permission to jump ship (which had already sank…I was drowning) and move on to a new life with grace and dignity worthy of love again. God gave me courage and hope. I am loving others without fear of rejection, inadequacy, insecurity, or the underlying inner conflict that poisoned my life and all my relationships. My overall countenance is dramatically different and my eyes shine again. The tension is gone. These are profound changes. It really is a step of shear bravery for anyone in this position who chooses to leave the wreckage of our estranged kids behind, swim to the top for air and swim to land. A journey all of us have to face. My prayers cover this site and all who visit or read Sheri’s book that they might find the same hope and recovery for their weary and broken hearts and find freedom and wholeness again. Ttyl

    • #12928
      AvatarMountainview
      Participant

      Dear Sheri, LostinC, Joyful, AUSSIEMOM,TetburyCastle,

      You are all such beautiful ladies and mothers, and such a wonderful and caring source of inspiration. Thank you everyone for your kind words and feedback.

      The journey to recovery, the path to healing, is uniquely different for each human being. Simply put, there’s no single magical pill, a proven panacea, or the perfect road to travel that would equally serve each one of us well. How to cope with grief and loss is as unique as our DNA. What has worked for me may simply not work for someone else. And that is perfectly ok. If we were all exactly the same…life wouldn’t be nowhere near as brilliantly diverse, and as amazingly interesting in all its offerings.

      Just as we as parents have the need to be loved, to be respected, to feel accepted, to be treated nonjudgmentally, to be understood, to be remembered, to feel empowered, to be taken care of, to be encouraged to feel self-worth and self-love, to have our privacy respected and boundaries honored, are also the same basic human needs of equal importance to our children.

      Of course, feeling rejected and neglected hurts deeply, be it our own child or the love of our lives that inflicted the pain. But from every tear eventually comes laughter; from every heartache eventually comes joy; from every momentary place of anger eventually comes compassion; from every storm eventually comes clear skies; and from life’s tragedies eventually comes triumphs. Our lives are shaped by our experiences – the good, the bad and the ugly. But above all, I truly believe it is our aptitude and more importantly our positive attitude that can guide us through the darkest hours and into the glorious light.

      When I think of all the beautiful mothers it brings a huge smile to my face. It makes me think of our beautiful garden – our lovely botanical oasis where we have many unique, colorful flowers and plants, and seasonal vegetables. Some flowers are very delicate and require shade and frequent watering, other plants are resilient to draught, heavy storms, blistering heat or freezing cold. In the winter, my husband and I will bring in the delicate ones inside the house, while the hardy ones can handle to stay outside. Each perfuming flower and exotic plant is unique and very special. Some have grown to majestic heights and interesting shapes. They attract Monarch butterflies and honeybees… and in those calming moments there’s spiritual harmony between the species.

      I imagine the beautiful mothers wearing their favorite color summer dress. Maybe white, yellow, pink, red, lavender, blue….happy girls singing and skipping along bare feet through the lovely meadow – until they reach the shoreline and are greeted by their smiling loved one, gourmet picnic basket in hand, ready to float along the lake and row away in the romantic canoe……

      Hugs and Kisses XOXOXOXOXO

    • #12934
      AvatarLostinC
      Participant

      Mountiainview. I have found this thread most helpful along with the fact I finished Sheri’s book. I was awash in relief when I realized that it’s okay to “jump ship”. It’s okay not continue being embroiled in everyone else’s mess. I have held on to the belief that if I just write the right words say sorry for the right things then all will be well. It’s a false belief. There is freedom in these thought and I see it just up ahead. Thanks to everyone for contributing for the benefit of the rest of us. I hope that someday there is a conference where we might all meet face to face.

    • #12936
      AUSSIEMOMAUSSIEMOM
      Participant

      Mountainview: “Just as we as parents have the need to be loved, to be respected, to feel accepted, to be treated nonjudgmentally, to be understood, to be remembered, to feel empowered, to be taken care of, to be encouraged to feel self-worth and self-love, to have our privacy respected and boundaries honored, are also the same basic human needs of equal importance to our children”.

      What beautiful words to share with us here and your words did make me think. Clearly, in my grief, I’ve tended to overlook the words you’ve spoken and yet, before the estrangement, those words, the manner in which my daughter was raised, aside from the privacy that children do not always have, I tried to honour my daughter’s differentness to me, to understand her, to love and respect her and in those, I never waivered, until the final termination and email which came through the internet, and not in a personal call to me. That may sound tinged with some bitterness, and yes, to use the internet, the computer screen from which to hide behind, it would have been a greater kindness I feel to have spoken to me directly. But then, this was not possible.

      You write beautifully but may we understand more about how you personally have coped, for you have reached a level that many may never reach,
      Aussiemom

    • #12938
      AvatarJoyful
      Participant

      I already said you are a great writer and I will say it again! Your post released the “feel-good” chemicals in my brain. I feel like I just drank a glass of my favorite wine. Thanks for giving.

    • #12939
      AvatarRainbow
      Participant

      Mountainview, your words are beautiful and I must say that I admire what you were able to achieve in 6 months.Even after all these years, I can’t shake off the loss and hurt. It is nestled deep within my heart and I know that I will carry those feelings to my grave. For the sake of my health and sanity, I have accepted what I cannot change and have learned to move forward and enjoy life as best as I can. I’ve been into this on and off estrangement since my ES was about 23. He is now 45 years old. I have grandchildren that were taken from my world. I have emotionally come a long way, but I still have my good and bad days and I struggle each day not to let the grief consume me as it once did. The pain is not as raw as it was in the beginning, but it still exists right under the surface of my heart. Rainbow

    • #12968
      rparentsrparents
      Keymaster

      Mountainview, you know from my book that I love the gardening analogy with its parallels to our own need for nurturing . . . as well as healing and growth. Your thoughts and mine align.

      In our life gardens, we can choose to see weeds, and all the work we have not done. OR, we can choose to see that there’s beauty even in the weeds. Many weeds are actually healing herbs. And looking at them in that light, even the weeds are gorgeous.

      Today, I will make a wish, and then blow the dandelion fluff away. A lot of worries are fluff!

      Sheri

    • #13036
      AvatarMountainview
      Participant

      Dear Sheri, LostinC, Joyful, AUSSIEMOM,TetburyCastle, Rainbow,

      Several mothers have asked and wondered how is it possible for “Mountainview” to recover within 6 months after her adult children’s estrangement? Countless mothers have been coping with the loss and pain of their adult child’s estrangement for many months or many years. How does one move on with their lives if the hurt and the wounds of estrangement seem to never heal? How can a mother ever become whole again without the presence of their adult child in her life?

      As I have mentioned earlier, the journey to recovery, the path to healing, is uniquely different for each human being. Simply put, there’s no single magical pill, a proven panacea, or the perfect road to travel that would equally serve each one of us well. How to cope with grief and loss is as unique as our DNA.

      Most people who have experienced loss benefit tremendously from having a healthy support system -such as a caring spouse or other loving family members. For others, their religious faith, their trust in God, is their best anchor to release the pain and find joy again. Others may need individual short-term or long-term therapy, or may need medical help or anti-depressant medication to help ease their pain, and be able to cope with their sadness and depression in order to recover from their loss or trauma.

      I don’t have a secret formula that I used to be able to arrive at a place of inner peace and happiness with my life. Without the need to pour out my entire life story, what I can tell you is that I have had steadfast life-long ability to overcome trauma, including numerous early childhood and early adulthood traumatic events. I also have a bottomless compassionate heart and love for humanity. My joy for life is endless and unwavering. I don’t allow any past negative events or past trauma to define who I am. Instead, I take in introspection and reflection of the past traumatic events as valuable lessons learned. Rather than dwell on the past, which I cannot change, I choose to live and enjoy the here and now – in the present time by focusing my positive energy and all my positive thoughts into productive and meaningful activities.

      My additional way of coping, especially with this sudden abandonment experience, was to engage myself in an intense intellectual study and learn as much as possible about this estrangement phenomenon. I did not want to live in hurt and doubt myself as a mother indefinitely. I had an immediate sense of curiosity and urgency to learn about the root causes and reasons for adult children to abandon or estrange from their loving and kind parents – and is this a unique, isolated occurrence or is there some type of silent epidemic occurring on a wide-scale, global level?. Within 2 months I read 7 books and various blogs. Out of all the book material I studied, it was Sheri’s book “Done With The Crying: Help and Healing for Mothers of Estranged Adult Children” that towered above the rest. Sheri’s book is by far the best and most transformative material.

      Once I completed the intense intellectual study of estrangement, I had transformed, metaphorically-speaking, from being inside the intense learning cocoon to becoming a free-floating butterfly again. I had quickly learned there are many, many reasons and root causes for estrangement.

      While the reasons listed below are not an exhaustive list, it covers some of the reasons and/or root causes for estrangement to occur.

      Examples of estrangement may be attributed to:

      1. past traumatic events
      2. communication breakdowns over time
      3. third party adversaries, interveners or influencers (i.e. girlfriend/boyfriend; fiancé/fiancée;
      wife/husband; in-laws, friends)
      4. unresolved generational trauma
      5. certain dynamics of emotional disarray
      6. false or unrealized ideations or expectations of parents
      7. failed adult children
      8. dependency of elderly parents
      9. parental alienation syndrome
      10. flawed or mismatched personalities between parent and adult child
      11. differences in core values and beliefs
      12. differences in lifestyles
      13. a variety of addiction dependencies
      14. delayed adult child maturation
      15. individuation fulfillment and independence from parents
      16. cultural shifts (i.e. less interest, less value, less meaning – or no interest, no value or meaning
      in maintaining long-term inter-generational relationships)
      17. prior or repeated cycles of generational estrangement
      18. mental health disorders
      19. overbearing, needy or clingy parents
      20. toxic, controlling or manipulative parents
      21. character disorders
      22. narcissistic personality disorders (NPD)
      23. entitlement issues by adult children
      24. self-centered generation – “Generation Me”
      25. arrested development
      26. borderline personality disorders
      27. prejudicial, racist or intolerant parents
      28. unresolved feelings of resentment or hatred
      29. injustice collectors – unable to let go or unwillingness to forgive any real or perceived prior wrongs
      30. sociopathic or psychopathic tendencies
      31. inability to feel compassion or express unconditional love
      32. exhausted people pleasers

      I have also learned there is no such thing as the “Perfect Family”. The “Perfect Family” is a complete myth. Every family has its own issues, problems, growing pains, drama, trauma secrets, skeletons, etc. Some families may appear “perfect” from the outside – but in reality they too have the same or similar issues and problems as most other families have.

      We know from cradle to grave that we all have unique journeys in our lives. Some lives have been tragically cut short while others have remarkably survived to become centennials who have outlived their own spouses, children, family members or life-long friends. What sets centennials apart from the rest, besides genetics, is their unique ability to overcome tremendous loss and grief and still find happiness, meaning and purpose in their lives.

      While each and everyone of us will experience our own unique life journey, in the end, we all, as mortals, will eventually arrive at the exact same destination – it’s called “death”. We may think about our legacy, how we lived, what we accomplished, what positive memorable events shaped our lives. How do we want to be remembered in our obituary? But until then, while we are still alive and continue in our life’s amazing journey, I would highly recommend the profound advice from Sheri’s book, page 5, under “Dedication”, wherein Sheri states:

      “For smart mothers everywhere. Enjoy your lives”.

      Hugs and Kisses XOXOXOXOXOXOXO

      Your Friend,

      Mountainview

    • #13043
      AvatarJoyful
      Participant

      Mountainview….. I am going to take parts of your posts and read them with my daily devotions. I like this best….that you don’t let trauma define you….it is a maturity I have longed for but just needed words and this moment to embrace it. A life changer. Thanks!

    • #13047
      AvatarRainbow
      Participant

      Mountainview, you write so beautifully. We all handle grief in our own way and I know that there is no time period as to when and if the grieving ends, but how I wish it were within my power to invent that magical pill. Thank You for responding and sharing your wisdom. Internet hugs of thanks sent your way. Rainbow

    • #13058
      AUSSIEMOMAUSSIEMOM
      Participant

      Mountainview, good on your for doing such research. Like you, when something traumatic happens, such as an illness or mental disorder, I’ve tried to and still do, try to read and research as much as possible about the subject. Intellectually, I feel I am then better prepared to deal with what is happening in my life, due to living with another in the family who is suffering. Intellectually I know too, that we are given this one life to live and however we are able to get through it, however we choose to live it, is our choice alone. This includes all the ups and downs of normal living, some more down than up at times. Emotionally I am slower to catch up with my intellect. No-one here has to share what is not to be shared of past experiences and I appreciate your writing and intellect. In six months it’s remarkable to be able to deal with such an abrupt removal in your life of your children. We all deal with estrangement in our own time and in our own way, it is helpful to hear how others deal with it. For some, it may be that this is the first or one of the few major traumas they’ve faced in life and without the involvement or ability to handle past trauma, the pathway to recovery is not as quick or as defined intellectually or emotionally. To me, estrangement is a conundrum not easily explained but I would have to agree that the list of causation you’ve kindly placed here, there is much I can relate to, sad, but true.
      Aussiemom

    • #13088
      AvatarMountainview
      Participant

      That is so true…. Even though we may have gained educational knowledge, deeper insight, clarity, and intellectual perspective in any given subject, or in this case a highly-emotional topic such as “estrangement”, it can still be extremely difficult to understand and process the deep hurt with its profound psychological and emotional wounds and scars.

      Of all the relationships we have, when it came to the relationship with our children, we made by far the biggest long-term investment in our lives. We gave it all in terms of our time, energy, care, love, nurture, emotional and financial support. The holy bond between mother and child is of pure divinity and unconditional love. When this precious bond is fractured or suddenly terminated it becomes one of the most painful and traumatic experiences of one’s life, sometimes worse than death, because when estrangement happens, especially in the early raw stages, it leaves you feeling completely shocked, suddenly abandoned, speechless, breathless, as if your heart has been violently ripped out and your beloved child has buried you alive.

      We so often feel all “alone”….but here we are together, in a united front, supporting one another – Thanks to Sheri – and find meaningful new ways and helpful coping strategies for one of the biggest tragedies of our lives.

      For today, I wanted to share with you, my dear fellow loving mothers, one of my favorite poems by Edgar Allan Poe.

      “Alone”

      From childhood’s hour I have not been
      As others were – I have not seen
      As others saw – I could not bring
      My passions from a common spring
      From the same source I have not taken
      My sorrow – I could not awaken
      My heart to joy at the same tone
      And all I lov’d – I lov’d alone
      Then – in my childhood – in the dawn
      Of a most stormy life – was drawn
      From ev’ry depth of good and ill
      The mystery which binds me still
      From the torrent, or the fountain
      From the red cliff of the mountain
      From the sun that ’round me roll’d
      In its autumn tint of gold
      From the lightning in the sky
      As it pass’d me flying by
      From the thunder, and the storm
      And the cloud that took the form
      When the rest of Heaven was blue
      Of a demon in my view

      Hugs and Kisses XOXOXOXOXOXOXO

      Your Friend,

      Mountainview

    • #13092
      rparentsrparents
      Keymaster

      Thanks for sharing this Mountainview. It’s truly beautiful! Haunting and lovely and puzzling too. I have to admit that there are few poems that stay with me. I am always in awe of those who follow poetry and get it and remember it … Although there are a few, a very few, that have stuck with me. One is this one by Jamie Sabines. I like to think of so many people all in our own lives filled with joy and pain, yet so much the same as we go outside at night and share the same moon. Nature is always my tonic. I’ll share this poem because I love it and hope you will too. (What a lovely thread!)

      you see the poem here: http://thecatalist.org/2009/09/the-moon-from-jaine-sabines-translated-by-m-s-merwin/ — It is not under public domain

      I hope you will all take your “tonic” tonight. It would be lovely from a Mountainview or anywhere.

      Sheri McGregor

    • #13093
      AvatarMountainview
      Participant

      That is an incredibly beautiful poem Sheri!

      It reminds me of how much we love our children – to the moon and back.

      Even if the moon is momentarily eclipsed for the many loving mothers, we know the moon is still out there – as well as the billions of bright-shining celestial stars that light up our darkest hours in the middle of the night.

      Thank you so much Sheri for sharing – and yes I will definitely take the lovely tonic tonight right from the top of my Mountainview . :- )

Viewing 25 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.